Entries 201 - 300 out of 2770 [28 pages]

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Biagio Marini (1594 - 1663):  Sonata Seconda a 3 - Op. 22, No. 22
source: Diversi generi di sonate da chiesa e da camera (Venice 1655)
scoring: AAB (Bc)

Adapted from the original score for two violins, cello and basso continuo.

  11
Joseph Bodin de Boismortier (1689 - 1755):  Premiere Sonate in E minor (G minor) - Op. 2, No. 1
source: Sonates a deux flûtes-traversieres sans basse. Op. 2 (Paris 1724)
scoring: AA
6
Jacques Hotteterre «le Romain» (1673 - 1763):  Prelude in G minor - Op. 7, No. 2
source: L’art de préluder. Op. 7 (Paris 1719)
scoring: A (Bc)
6
Johann Mattheson (1681 - 1764):  Sonata I in D minor - Op. 1, No. 1
source: XII Sonates à 2 et 3 flutes sans bass. Op. 1 (Amsterdam 1708)
scoring: AA
Version 1.10 (2015-03-19): corrected a misprint in the music.
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Jean Baptiste [John] Loeillet of London (1680 - 1730):  Sonata IV a 3 con Flauto e Hautboy in D minor - Op. 2, No. 4
source: XII sonatas in three parts. Op. 2 (London c. 1725)
scoring: A or AT (Oboe, Bc)

The oboe part can be played by a tenor recorder player with average skills.

10
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  Checking Into A Famous Hotel
scoring: ATTB (Harmonic Instrument ad libitum)
  4
Jean Baptiste Loeillet de Gant (1688 - c. 1720):  Sonata II in Bb major - Op. 3, No. 2
source: XII Sonates a une Flute & Basse Continue. Op. 3 (Amsterdam [1715])
scoring: A (Bc)
 6
Johann Christian Schickhardt (c. 1681 - 1762):  Concerto IV in F major - Op. 19, No. 4
source: VI Concerts à Quatre Flutes et Basse Continue. Op. 19 (Amsterdam c. 1715)
scoring: AAAA (Bc)
7
Jacques-Christophe Naudot (c. 1690 - 1762):  Troisième Babiole in C major - Op. 10, No. 3
source: VI Babioles. Op. 10 (Paris [1737])
scoring: AA
5
Andreas Heinrich Schultzen (1681 - 1741):  Sonata VI in D minor
source: VI Sonate a Flauto solo con Cimbalo o vero Fagotto (Amsterdam [1703]), No. 6
scoring: A (Bc)
5
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  4 Chords 4 4 Recorders
scoring: ATTB (Harmonic Instrument ad libitum)
  8
Stephen Foster (1826 - 1864):  My Old Kentucky Home
scoring: SATB
  3
Francesco Bendusi (flourished 1553):  Desiderata
source: Opera nova de balli a quattro. Accomodati da cantare et sonare d’ogni sorte de stromenti (Venice 1553), No. 3
scoring: ATBB

This piece belongs to collection of ensemble dance pieces that has an important place in the history of instrumental music of the 16th century, since it is not only the first but also one of the rare Italian publications of its kind.

The narrow range of all the parts makes them suitable for any kind of instruments, not least the crumhorn.

  5
Johannes Brahms (1833 - 1897):  «Göttlicher Morpheus», Canon a 4 - Op. 113, No. 1
scoring: CCCC or AAAA
   7
Alessandro Scarlatti (1660 - 1725):  O cessate di piagarmi, Arietta
source: Il Pompeo (Rome 1682)
scoring: A (Harpsichord)

Divisions of the recorder line are editorial.

 4
Michel Blavet (1700 - 1768):  Sonata terza in E minor (G minor) - Op. 3, No. 3
source: Troisieme livre de sonates pour la Flûte traversiere avec la Basse. Op. 3 (Paris 1740)
scoring: A (Bc)
Version 1.10 (2015-02-25): corrected a little misprint in the flute/recorder part of the first movement. Thanks to Farid for having pointed out the question.

There is a riddle in the first movement of this sonata. It occurs at end of both repeats, where the flute part bears two different lines: the upper one is a minim repeated three times (three bars) the other walks by quavers (eighth notes) matching the bass line.

Which line is the flute supposed to play? My short answer is: I do not know. And now I can describe three possible solutions:

  1. The flute plays the minims while the harpsichord right hand plays the quavers;
  2. The flute plays first the upper line and on repeat the quavers;
  3. The flute plays both lines using the minims as appoggiature of the real melody line; that is, the quavers.

Whoever knows a certain answer or has a better guess, please let us know.

 5
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  Ack Värmeland, du sköna (Dear Old Stockholm), Swedish folk song
scoring: TBB (Keyboard ad libitum)
  5
Jacques Hotteterre «le Romain» (1673 - 1763):  Prelude in D major (F major) - Op. 7, No. 1
source: L’art de préluder. Op. 7 (Paris 1719)
scoring: A (Bc)

The original D major version contains adaptations of its range – which reaches the low D – to that of a treble recorder. The F major version is entirely editorial.

5
Benedetto Marcello (1686 - 1739):  Trio Sonata V in C major
source: VI sonata a tre. Due violoncello o due viole da gamba (c. 1736), No. 5
scoring: ATB (Bc)

Adapted for ATB recorders from the original score in Bb major for cellos or viols.

 10
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  Passamezzo moderno
scoring: ATTB
  7
Michel Blavet (1700 - 1768):  Sonata seconda in B minor (D minor) - Op. 3, No. 2
source: Troisieme livre de sonates pour la Flûte traversiere avec la Basse. Op. 3 (Paris 1740)
scoring: A (Bc)
 7
Francesco Bendusi (flourished 1553):  Moschetta
source: Opera nova de balli a quattro. Accomodati da cantare et sonare d’ogni sorte de stromenti (Venice 1553), No. 2
scoring: ATTB or ATBB

This piece belongs to collection of ensemble dance pieces that has an important place in the history of instrumental music of the 16th century, since it is not only the first but also one of the rare Italian publications of its kind.

The narrow range of all the parts makes them suitable for any kind of instruments, not least the crumhorn.

 4
Johann Joachim Quantz (1697 - 1773):  Pastorale - QV 2:Anh.31
source: Musica 2470-Q-19. Sächsische Landesbibliothek, Dresden
scoring: AAB

This is the first movement of a trio sonata in A major for two transverse flutes doubtfully attributed to Quantz. I simply transposed it in Bb major and slightly adapted the bass line for a bass recorder.

  5
Francesco Bendusi (flourished 1553):  Pass’e mezo ditto il Romano
source: Opera nova de balli a quattro. Accomodati da cantare et sonare d’ogni sorte de stromenti (Venice 1553), No. 1
scoring: ATTB or ATBB

This piece belongs to collection of ensemble dance pieces that has an important place in the history of instrumental music of the 16th century, since it is not only the first but also one of the rare Italian publications of its kind.

 6
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  Sitz a schöns Vogerl im Tannabaum, Folksong from Lower Austria
scoring: STT
 2
Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714 - 1788):  Oboe Solo - Wq 135 (H 549)
source: Ms. cote 5521. Conservatoire Royal de Musique, Bruxelles
scoring: A (Bc)

It is apparent from the title that this sonata was conceived for an oboe; nevertheless; it works quite well for a treble recorder transposed a tone up in A minor with the addition of minor adjustments.

Thanks to Bruno for drawing my attention to it.

5
Johannes Brahms (1833 - 1897):  «Einförmig ist der Liebe Gram» - Op. 113, No. 13
scoring: TTTTBB

The theme of this canon is from Schubert’s Winterreise Lied «Der Leiermann».

   8
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  Au Clair de la Lune, French popular song
scoring: ATB (Keyboard ad libitum)
 8
Tarquinio Merula (c. 1594 - 1665):  Canzon La Lusignola
source: Canzoni a quattro voci. Libro primo (1615)
scoring: SATB
Version 1.50 (2015-02-08): corrected a few oddities in the musical structure, mostly in the bass line.
 10
Francesco Bendusi (flourished 1553):  Bandera
source: Opera nova de balli a quattro. Accomodati da cantare et sonare d’ogni sorte de stromenti (Venice 1553), No. 19
scoring: SATB

This piece belongs to collection of ensemble dance pieces that has an important place in the history of instrumental music of the 16th century, since it is not only the first but also one of the rare Italian publications of its kind.

The narrow range of all the parts makes them suitable for any kind of instruments, not least the crumhorn.

 3
Giorgio Pacchioni (1947 - ):  Tarantella siciliana
scoring: C (Piano)
 3
Francesco Bendusi (flourished 1553):  La mala vecchia
source: Opera nova de balli a quattro. Accomodati da cantare et sonare d’ogni sorte de stromenti (Venice 1553), No. 6
scoring: ATTB

This piece belongs to collection of ensemble dance pieces that has an important place in the history of instrumental music of the 16th century, since it is not only the first but also one of the rare Italian publications of its kind.

The narrow range of all the parts makes them suitable for any kind of instruments, not least the crumhorn.

  5
Johann David Heinichen (1683 - 1729):  Concerto grosso based on Seibel 211
source: Mus. ms. 240/3. Manuscript preserved in Darmstadt: Hessische Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek
Edited and/or arranged by Jan Jaap Langereis
scoring: AAAATTBLF

This is an arrangement for recorders only – made by Jan Jaap Langereis – of the original concerto for four recorders in G and strings (see the related-entry link for more information). The division between «Concertino» and «Concerto grosso» implies that the four treble recorders – which belong to the concertino – should play solo, while the lower recorders, belonging to the concerto grosso, can be doubled ad libitum.

 3
Sholom Secunda (1894 - 1974):  Donna Donna (דאַנאַ דאַנאַ)
scoring: SATB or SSAB

Arranged for recorders following the autograph manuscript.

   8
Ruggiero Giovannelli (c. 1560 - 1625):  Iesu summa benignitas
source: Diletto spirituale (Rome 1586)
scoring: ATB or SAT

This sacred canzonet has been transcribed from the harpsichord tablature, which contains original divisions.

 3
Giorgio Mainerio (c. 1535 - 1582):  Ballo Anglese
source: Recueil de danseries, contenant presque toutes sortes de danses (Antwerp 1583), No. 45
scoring: SATB or SSAT

This dance was first published in Mainerio's Il primo libro de balli a quattro voci (Venice 1578).

 5
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  Schlaf, Kindchen, also wohl, German popular song
scoring: ATB
  2
Alessandro Besozzi (1702 - 1793):  Sonata VI in Bb major
source: Six Sonatas or Duets for two German Flutes or Violins (London c. 1750), No. 6
scoring: AA

The original score for two flutes or violins has been transposed a third above for two treble recorders.

4
Traditional:  What if a day, English popular song of the Elizabethan time
scoring: A (Harpsichord)

There are few English songs which afford more room for speculation than this one. Its origin and its authorship are both in doubt, for it is one of those songs which are found in two countries, and while it has been ascribed to a particular author, there is presumptive evidence that it was popular long before he was born. «What if a day» is well known in Holland under the title of «Berg op Zoom», in which shape it will be found in Kremser’s Altniederlandische Volkslieder. Here it is a patriotic song of splendid martial vigor. But it is also found in a Dutch publication of 1647 under the name of «Essex’s Lamentation». Furthermore, Herr Daniel de Lange, a distinguished Dutch musician and Director of the Amsterdam Conservatory of Music, informed the writer that Holland had few if any original folk-songs; that most of those current there could be traced back to an English, French or German origin. From these facts, it would seem probable that the tune is English and was carried over to Holland by some of Elizabeth’s soldiers who fought in the Low Countries. There is some doubt as to the authorship. In one or two early collections it is assigned to Thomas Campion, but that means nothing, for editors were flagrantly careless about such things at that period and much later. Playford was the most careful of them, yet the song «Why should’st thou swear» was assigned to no less than three different composers in three successive editions of his Ayres, all published within seven years. Neither words nor music of «What if a day» are to be found in the collection of Campion’s songs, and from the dates of references to it and the similarity of its words to older songs, it may very well belong to a much earlier period than the beginning of the seventeenth century, when Campion lived.

from Frank Hunter Potter’s Introduction to Reliquary of English Song. Vol. 1 (London 1915)

  6
Alessandro Scarlatti (1660 - 1725):  Concerto in A minor
scoring: SSAB

The source of this piece is Six Concertos in seven parts for two violins and violoncello obligate with two violins more a tenor and thorough bass (Benjamin Cooke, London 1740). Alessandro Scarlatti had been dead for fifteen years before that date and looking at the structure of the concertos we are quite sure that these pieces were not originally conceived as concerti grossi by the composer.

 15
Francesco Mancini (1672 - 1737):  Sonata II in E minor
source: XII Solos for a flute with a thorough bass for the harpsichord or bass violin (J. Walsh [1724]), No. 2
scoring: A (Bc)
Version 1.50 (2015-01-30): Revamped layout and corrected a mistake in the music: I thank Jan Jaap for pointing out the mistake.
 5
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  Edwin Alton's Valzer
scoring: STT

The 16-bar melody is taken from Edwin H. Alton’s Metodo facile per flauto dolce soprano (1971).

 4
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  L'Apprenti Pastouriau, French popular song
scoring: ATB (Bc)
 4
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  The Marsh Of Rhuddlan, Welsh traditional song
scoring: STB (Bc)
  4
Giovanni Battista Riccio (flourished 1609-21):  Domine, in tua misericordia, [Motet] a 2 soprani ovvero tenori
source: Il terzo libro delle divine lodi musicali (Venice 1620)
scoring: AAB (Bc)

The bass recorder is ad libitum and may be omitted from the performance.

 1
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  Love will find out the way, English popular song of the Elizabethan time
scoring: SAT (Bc)
  7
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  Scaramella, fantasia based on a 15th-century popular melody
scoring: SAB (Harmonic Instrument ad libitum)
  5
Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714 - 1788):  Trio sonata for three recorders AAB
source: Mus. Ms. Bach 357. Manuscript preserved in Berlin: State Library of Prussian Culture
Edited and/or arranged by David Bellugi
scoring: AAB (Bc ad libitum)
Version 1.50 (2015-01-24): several improvements to the treble recorder parts have been added.

This arrangement was conceived in the recorder class of Prof. David Bellugi at the Conservatorio di Firenze.

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Tarquinio Merula (c. 1594 - 1665):  Canzone Prima a 3
source: Concerti spirituali con alcune sonate. Libro secondo (Venice 1628)
scoring: AA or SSB (Bc)

Our edition presents – beyond the faithful transcription of the original scoring for two violins, violone and continuo – an arrangement for two treble recorders, cello (or similar instrument) and continuo plus another adaptation for SSB recorders and continuo.

The continuo realization is editorial.

  7
Ambrosius Wilfflingseder (? - 1563):  Trio 6
source: Musica Teutsch der Jugent zu gut gestelt (Nuremberg 1561), No. 6
scoring: SSA
1
Giovanni Gentile (? - post 1649):  Canone a due voci cavato dalle lettere vocali del nome e cognome dell’eminentissimo e reverendissimo cardinale Brancaccio
source: Solfeggiamenti et ricercari a due voci (Rome 1642)
scoring: STB

This composition is found at the end of both part-books of the collection. It is based on a retrograde canon that praises the dedicatee, Cardinal Francesco Maria Brancaccio, in two ways: the most evident is given by the canon singing «Franciscus Maria Brancatius» throughout the piece; the second is subtler and relies on the early technique of transforming the dedicatee’s name in solmization syllables in the same way used by Josquin in his mass Hercules Dux Ferrariae.

The way in which Giovanni Gentile managed the canon with all its technicalities shows that he was a quite skilled – though unrecognized –composer.

The solmization syllables in the transcription are editorial.

 4
Giovanni Gentile (? - post 1649):  Ricercata Prima
source: Solfeggiamenti et ricercari a due voci (Rome 1642), No. 1
scoring: ST or TB

In his foreword to the reader, among other interesting things about didactic praxis, Marco Aurelio Desideri – editor of this collection and pupil of the main composer – explains that these duos can be performed in two ways. At the beginning of each part there are two clefs, one with a flat in the key signature and one without it:

That allows the performers to play the duo in two different keys just switching to the second clef. Using the clef at left, the music will result a fifth lower than using the main key, which is the right one.

Following this rule, we trascribed each ricercata twice.

You may read the whole foreword to the reader here.

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Thomas Morley (c. 1557 - 1602):  Now is the month of Maying
source: The first booke of balletts to five voyces (London 1595), No. 3
scoring: SSTTB or SATTB

This ballet by Morley is based on the canzonet So ben mi ch'a bon tempo by Orazio Vecchi found in his 1590 Selva di varia ricreatione. Vecchi’s piece is itself an arrangement of prius factus material.

Our edition presents the faithful transcription of Morley's original 1595 print and its textless version, useful for non-singing players.

 6
Traditional:  Trippole Trappole, Neapolitan song
Edited and/or arranged by Andrea Bornstein
scoring: AAB
   2
Franz Tunder (1614 - 1667):  Da pacem Domine, Sinfonia a 7 viole
scoring: AATTB (2 Bass Instruments)

Despite the fact that this piece was conceived for viols, it works well with low recorders too, providing the two lowest parts are played on two bass instruments, like viols or cellos.

The title «Da pacem Domine» does not seem to be related to the well-known melody (see a list of pieces based on that melody).

  6
Domenico Galli (1649 - 1691):  Sonata IV in G minor
source: Trattenimento musicale sopra il violoncello a’ solo (Modena 1691), No. 4
scoring: A

Adapted from the original score for solo cello.

 6
Charles-François Gounod (1818 - 1893):  Gloria
source: Messe no. 6 aux cathédrales
scoring: SATB or SSAB
  3
Giovanni Giacomo Gastoldi (c. 1554 - 1609):  L'Acceso
source: Balletti a cinque voci (Antwerp 1596), No. 16
scoring: SSATB
 4
Giovanni Giacomo Gastoldi (c. 1554 - 1609):  Il Martellato
source: Balletti a cinque voci (Antwerp 1596), No. 15
scoring: SSATB

Also editorially transposed a note above.

2
Giovanni Giacomo Gastoldi (c. 1554 - 1609):  Caccia d'Amore
source: Balletti a cinque voci (Antwerp 1596), No. 14
scoring: SSATB
 3
Jean Baptiste [John] Loeillet of London (1680 - 1730):  Sonata VI in D minor - Op. 3, No. 6
source: Solos for a German flute or violin. Op. 3 (London [1729])
scoring: A (Bc)
5
Josquin des Pres (c. 1440 - 1521):  El Grillo
source: Frottole. Libro tertio (O. Petrucci, Venice 1504)
scoring: AATB or TTTB
  4
Giovanni de Macque (c. 1548 - 1614):  Consonanze stravaganti
scoring: SATB

from Willi Apel, The History of Keyboard Music to 1700 (Indiana University Press, Bloomington 1972)

 3
Gioachino Rossini (1792 - 1868):  Solfeggio No. 2
source: Gorgheggi e Solfeggi (Bruxelles 1827)
scoring: A or C (Piano)
 3
Jean Baptiste Loeillet de Gant (1688 - c. 1720):  Sonata VI in E minor - Op. 3, No. 6
source: XII Sonates a une Flute & Basse Continue. Op. 3 (Amsterdam [1715])
scoring: G or A (Bc)

In all likelihood, this sonata was conceived for a treble recorder in G; nonetheless, it is suitable for a common treble recorder as well. A transposed part is provided to ease the performance on a recorder in G.

3
Giovanni Felice Sances (c. 1600 - 1679):  Lagrimosa beltà, Cantada a doi voci in Ciacona
source: Cantade a voce sola. Libro 2 (Venice 1633)
scoring: AT (Bc)
  4
Giovanni Felice Sances (c. 1600 - 1679):  Usurpator tiranno, Cantada a voce sola sopra il Passacaglie
source: Cantade a voce sola. Libro 2 (Venice 1633)
scoring: C or A (Bc)
  9
Jean Mouton (ante 1459 - 1522):  Nesciens mater virgo virum, quadruple canon
source: Heinrich Glareanus, Dodekachordon (1547)
scoring: SATTTTTB or SAAATTTB
3
Biagio Marini (1594 - 1663):  Sarabanda IV - Op. 22, No. 8
source: Diversi generi di sonate da chiesa e da camera (Venice 1655)
scoring: ATB or AAB (Bass instrument, Bc ad libitum)

Arranged from the original score for strings with editorial divisions.

 5
Josquin des Pres (c. 1440 - 1521):  Jocose song of King Louis XII
source: Heinrich Glareanus, Dodekachordon (1547)
scoring: AATB or SSTB
Version 2.00 (2014-12-21): revamped layout and added all the wanting files.

Song has been sought and invented for the sake of pleasure, but it can be useful for many things besides; from this I do not exclude jesting, provided that it may be mature and honorabie. Moreover, jesting is more praiseworthy and has true merit if it occurs with dignity and is selected for a favorable moment.
Some relate such stories about Josquin des Prez, and it is of such a kind which we are now going to tell. Louis XII, the French king, is said to have had a very inadequate voice. He had formerly been pleased by some song and asked the chief of his singers if there was anyone who would compose a song in several voices in which he could also sing some part. The singer, wondering at the demand of the king, whom he knew to be entirely ignorant of music, hesitated a while and finally decided what he would answer. «My King», he said, «I shall compose a song in which your Majesty will also be given a place in the singing».
The following day, after the King had had breakfast and was to be refreshed with songs, according to royal custom, the singer produced this song, composed in four voices, which we shall soon subjoin. In it I do not approve the skill of his art so much as I praise industry joined with art. For he had composed the song so that two boys would sing very lightly and delicately the cantus, taken from a single theme, evidently so that the exceedingly thin voice of the King would not be drowned out. He had given the King the next voice, notated on one continual tone in the range of the alto, a range which would be suitable to the royal voice. Not content with this device, (he regarded everything so zealously in a matter indeed small, but through which he made the king friendly to him), and so that the King would not waver in pitch, the composer, who was going to sing the bass, arranged this bass voice so that at regular intervals he would support the King at the octave, on the alternate tone of the half tempus. But the octave is like the unison, through which octave the voice of the King was helped exceedingly. The King laughed merrily at the trick and gladly dismissed the composer with a present and with the desired favor. I said that jesting of this kind pleases me.
But now let us hear a rare miracle, the King himself singing with his singers. The text was in the Latin tongue, in that mutilated speech in which France, having deserted the acient tongue of the Gauls, more truly stammers than it speaks. But everyone shall be free to write what he wishes under the notes.

Heinrich Glareanus, Dodekachordon (Basel 1547),   Liber III, p.  468

 

 5
Pieter Luidhens (XVII cent.):  Capricie
source: 't Uitnement Kabinet. 2 vols (Amsterdam 1646-49)
scoring: C or SB (Viol, Bc)

Our edition contains the transcription of the original score for generic descant instrument, viol and continuo instrument, and an adaptation for descant and bass recorder together with continuo instrument.

  9
Franz Liszt (1811 - 1886):  Ave maris stella
scoring: TTBB
 6
Costanzo Porta (c. 1528 - 1601):  Agnus Dei II, Missa «La Sol Fa Re Mi»
source: Missarum liber primus (Venice 1578)
scoring: SSATTTTB or SSAAATTB

La sol fa re mi is probably the most famous solmization series exploited as a compositional obbligo. The theorist Heinrich Glareanus states that this famous syllable series derived from the phrase «Lascia fare mi» that Cardinal Ascanio Sforza of Milan used when making promises that he very seldom kept. Josquin – the first composer to use this obbligo – was in the service of Cardinal Ascanio Sforza in the penultimate decade of the fifteenth century and the theme could have derived from the barzelletta «Lassa fare a mi, non ti curare» developed from Ascanio’s phrase and attributed to Serafino Aquilano, who was also in the service of the prelate and a great friend of Josquin.

Furthermore, Porta in his mass added to this obbligo the canonic one. Three parts ideally sing «La sol fa re mi» in canon (with the Agnus Dei words): the antecedent (T3) is followed by two consequents, T1 at the unison after three breves and T4 a fourth below after one breve.

 4
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 - 1943):  Vocalise (1915) - Op. 34, No. 14
scoring: A (Piano)
   6
Thomas Stoltzer (c. 1480 - 1526):  Ave maris stella
scoring: ATTB or GTTB
 4
Francesco Paolo Tosti (1846 - 1916):  Marechiare
Edited and/or arranged by Andrea Bornstein
scoring: ATBB (Harmonic Instrument ad libitum)
  5
Christiaen Herwich (XVII cent.):  Derde Stuck
source: 't Uitnement Kabinet. 2 vols (Amsterdam 1646-49)
scoring: C or SB (Viol, Bc)

Our edition contains the transcription of the original score for generic descant instrument, viol and continuo instrument, and an adaptation for descant and bass recorder together with continuo instrument.

 4
William Byrd (c. 1540 - 1623):  Hodie Simon Petrus, Motet a 6
source: Gradualia (London 1610)
scoring: GGTTBB or AATTBB

This motet is textless in the original print of Byrd's Gradualia (1610); hence it was probably thought there for an instrumental performance.

  6
Jean Baptiste Loeillet de Gant (1688 - c. 1720):  Sonata I in C major - Op. 3, No. 1
source: XII Sonates a une Flute & Basse Continue. Op. 3 (Amsterdam [1715])
scoring: G or A (Bc)

In all likelihood, this sonata was conceived for a treble recorder in G; nonetheless, it is suitable for a common treble recorder as well. A transposed part is provided to ease the performance on a recorder in G.

6
Gioachino Rossini (1792 - 1868):  Solfeggio No. 1
source: Gorgheggi e Solfeggi (Bruxelles 1827)
scoring: A (Piano)
 3
Nicola Matteis (? - post 1713):  Trio sonata in A minor
source: 2045-Q-1, Manuscript preserved in Dresden: Sächsische Landesbibliothek – Staats- und Universitätbibliothek
scoring: AA (Bc)
Version 1.50 (2014-12-07): editorially added all the continuo figures and corrected a few mistakes in the music.

Arranged from the original score for two violins and continuo.

  10
Jacques-Christophe Naudot (c. 1690 - 1762):  Deuxième Babiole in C major - Op. 10, No. 2
source: VI Babioles. Op. 10 (Paris [1737])
scoring: AA
7
Andrea Falconieri (c. 1585 - 1656):  Passacalle
source: Il primo libro di canzone, sinfonie, fantasie […] a uno, due e tre con il basso continuo (Naples 1650)
scoring: SSB or CC (Viol, Bc)
  8
Jacob van Eyck (c. 1589 - 1657):  Questa dolce sirena
source: Der Fluyten Lust-hof (1649-54), No. 127
scoring: C
8
Andrea Falconieri (c. 1585 - 1656):  Folias echa para mi Señora Doña Tarolilla de Caranellos
source: Il primo libro di canzone, sinfonie, fantasie […] a uno, due e tre con il basso continuo (Naples 1650)
scoring: SSB or AA (Viol, Bc)

The Folia variations by Falconieri are interesting because stylistically they can be placed between the Gamba ricercar by Ortiz (Naples 1555) and the seminal Follia by Arcangelo Corelli (1700). Falconieri’s work diverges from the former but does not resemble the latter yet.

  10
Andrea Falconieri (c. 1585 - 1656):  Battalla de Barabaso yerno de Satanas [Battle of Barabaso, Satan’s son-in-law]
source: Il primo libro di canzone, sinfonie, fantasie […] a uno, due e tre con il basso continuo (Naples 1650)
scoring: SSB or CC (Bc)
  4
Gaetano Donizetti (1797 - 1848):  Una furtiva lagrima
source: L'elisir d'amore (1832)
scoring: A (Piano)
 5
Jacob Arcadelt (c. 1504 - 1568):  Iniustissimo amore, madrigal a 4
source: Il primo libro de madrigali a quattro voci (Venice 1539)
scoring: TTTB

With editorial divisions of all the parts.

  8
Johann Crüger (1598 - 1662):  Exercitatio 37
source: Musicae practicae. Praecepta brevia et exercitia pro tyronibus varia (Berlin 1660), No. 37
scoring: SAT
4
Andrea Bornstein (1956 - ):  Cantando su un solfeggio, based on Bertalotti’s Solfeggio Quarantesimo Sesto (1744)
scoring: STB
  11
Alessandro Besozzi (1702 - 1793):  Sonata V in G minor
source: Six Sonatas or Duets for two German Flutes or Violins (London c. 1750), No. 5
scoring: AA

The original score for two flutes or violins has been transposed a third above for two treble recorders.

2
Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827):  Adagio cantabile, Theme of the 2nd movement from Grande Sonate Pathétique
scoring: SATB
  4
Ambrosius Wilfflingseder (? - 1563):  Trio 5
source: Musica Teutsch der Jugent zu gut gestelt (Nuremberg 1561), No. 5
scoring: SSA or CCC

Also editorially transposed a tone above.

 4
Ambrosius Wilfflingseder (? - 1563):  Trio 4
source: Musica Teutsch der Jugent zu gut gestelt (Nuremberg 1561), No. 4
scoring: CCC
 4
Traditional:  What Child is This? [Greensleeves]
source: Old Christmas Carols, Traditional Melodies. First Set newly arranged, harmonized and edited by S. Archer Gibson (New York 1904), No. 7
scoring: SATB
   3
Traditional:  The First Noël
source: Old Christmas Carols, Traditional Melodies. First Set newly arranged, harmonized and edited by S. Archer Gibson (New York 1904), No. 6
scoring: SATB
  2
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756 - 1791):  Der Hölle Rache, Queen of the Night’s Aria
source: Die Zauberflöte - K 620
scoring: A (Keyboard)
6
Traditional:  A Virgin Unspotted
source: Old Christmas Carols, Traditional Melodies. First Set newly arranged, harmonized and edited by S. Archer Gibson (New York 1904), No. 5
scoring: SATB
 4
Traditional:  God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen
source: Old Christmas Carols, Traditional Melodies. First Set newly arranged, harmonized and edited by S. Archer Gibson (New York 1904), No. 4
scoring: SATB
 2
Traditional:  O Little Town of Bethlehem
source: Old Christmas Carols, Traditional Melodies. First Set newly arranged, harmonized and edited by S. Archer Gibson (New York 1904), No. 3
scoring: SATB or ATTB
 2